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FAQ

You have questions we have answers. Below are some common FAQ’s. If you have a question thats not on the list send us an email @ support@gazellemovers.com

When is the best time to move?

It’s important to take all factors into consideration when deciding on the best time for you to move. If you have some flexibility in your schedule, providing the moving company with a five-day window for loading your shipment can be greatly beneficial. This will allow the individuals who schedule your drivers and moving crew greater flexibility when scheduling your move. If possible, try to be flexible with your arrival time frame as well—keep in mind that you most likely are not the only shipment the truck is currently moving. Offering a flexible time frame can make a world of difference, and make your entire process of moving much easier.

When should I begin contacting moving companies for free moving estimates?

Try to provide the moving companies with as much notice as possible, especially if you are moving during a busy summer season, as noted above. Six weeks from the actual move date is a great time frame for estimators to come into your home and complete a visual survey of your household goods shipment. It is also a good idea to add even more time to make a decision, in the event that you are obligated by your employer to submit moving estimates for a corporate relocation. Try to decide which mover you will use at least four weeks from your actual load day. Additionally, call the mover to confirm your booking and schedule your packing, loading and delivery dates. This time frame can be shortened if you are moving outside of the peak moving season (September 15 through May 15 are considered “off peak” months, which generally feature less moving traffic).

What is a binding estimate?

A binding estimate is a contract that specifies, in advance, the precise cost of moving based on the services requested or deemed necessary at the time of the estimate. If additional moving services are requested or required at either origin or destination, then the total cost will increase.

What is a non-binding estimate?

A non-binding estimate charges you according to the actual weight of your shipment, along with the cost of any moving services that are performed (you will still go through the estimation process to determine what your shipment may cost).

To verify the weight of your shipment, the driver will weigh his trailer prior to loading your shipment. Once your shipment is on board, the driver will weigh his trailer again. All other moving charges will be calculated at your origin’s address. If there are any additional charges that are incurred during the delivery process, the driver will provide you with the additional cost (although this is a rare event, it can occur in certain cases).

How should I pay and what are the payment methods?

Tariff provisions require that all moving charges be paid before your shipment is unloaded at the destination. Payments can be made using cash, certified check, or money order. Other payment options, such as a credit card, can be arranged with your professional moving service provider. Discuss these options with the relocation specialist and/or the customer service representative assigned to your shipment. In the event that your employer is paying for the move, the employer may pre-arrange to be billed via invoice. Whatever works best for your situation is great—just be sure to have the details worked out prior to when packing and loading begins –if the method of payment is not established prior to load day, it can cause you problems on delivery day.

What is an Inventory?

The driver will generally inventory your shipment as he or she loads it (although it is not required by law). When completed, the inventory provides a detailed, descriptive listing of your household goods, along with the condition of each item when received by the mover.

Be sure that everything listed on the inventory is correct. This is not always the easiest task, as you will find things written on the inventory such as “PBO,” which means “packed by owner.” The contents of this carton cannot be listed, as the driver is simply not able to see inside each and every box. You will also sometimes find “CP” on a line item in the inventory, which means “carrier packed” container.

You may also notice, in the middle column on your inventory form, a line that has many seemingly random letters and numbers associated with a specific item. This is where a driver uses inventory code to make note of the condition of a particular item. To understand this code, you can refer to the top of the inventory sheet for a legend that will explain what each code means. For example, SC means scratched; C means chipped; the number 3 refers to the right side of piece; and 8 refers to the top of the piece. This is a simple (and consistent) way for the driver to make note of any irregularities or existing damage.

Remember, this inventory is for you to keep track of what is loaded, and the condition of each item. If damage occurs on a particular piece during the loading process, make a note of the inventory tag number on that item and indicate it in the far right hand column on the line that corresponds with that piece. This is the document that will be scrutinized when the claims process is initiated, so it is important to have the damage clearly noted.

This inventory should also be used at-destination when your shipment is delivered. Use the inventory to verify the articles that are delivered and, again, note an exception to the condition of any items as they are brought into your home. Point out the damage to the driver.

What often occurs is that a piece of furniture has been in your home for many years and you grow accustomed to looking at it in a certain place and in a certain light. When you bring that same piece into your new home, you may notice damage that may have been there for a long time. The driver will have noted the scratch or chip at your origin residence. If you are not sure if it was existing damage or new damage, ask your driver to explain the condition of the piece as he noted it on the inventory during the loading process. This is the quickest way to distinguish new damage from what was there all along.

Our drivers are very careful about the way they handle your items, and the inventory is their safeguard against potentially fraudulent damage claims. Use this inventory to your advantage in making sure that you are protected, just as the driver uses it to protect himself or herself.

Can I pack anything in the drawers of my dresser or desk?

All loose items must be packed in boxes to prevent loss or damage while moving. It is recommended that you pack all items and leave the drawers empty.

Can I pack and move my plants?

Most moving companies will not take your plants. The stress and heat of being inside the moving trailer usually causes them to die. Many states do not allow the entry of plants while other states will admit plants under certain conditions. There are some states that have no regulations at all. Be sure to understand your state’s regulations prior to moving the plants in your own vehicle.

What should I do with my jewelry and other valuable items?

Items of extraordinary value such as jewelry, money, antiques, and stamp collections can be included in your shipment, provided that you notify your local moving representative of these items before packing and moving day. It is strongly recommended that you carry irreplaceable and expensive articles with you, or make alternate arrangements for their transport.

In the moving industry, items worth more than $100 per pound are considered to be articles of “extraordinary value.” To be assured that a claim involving these articles is not limited to minimal liability, complete and sign your mover’s high-value inventory form. Also, be sure to sign the “Extraordinary Value Article Declaration” box, if applicable, on your Bill of Lading.

Each mover has a slightly different procedure to follow as it relates to high-value items. Ask your relocation specialist to provide you with an explanation of their company’s process. This is a confusing (but important) task, so be sure that you clearly understand the rules prior to load day.